Birdman, get in here!

cakesexuality:

neriede:

Can I just…..?????

Like, this is the single most beautiful piece of animation ever, I mean

image

Go ahead, click and drag it, I fucking GUARANTEE that whatever frame it lands on will make you feel better about your day.

image

image

image

image

thebicker:

lacigreen:

joponyhere:

lillianloverly:

THIS IS A PSA

THIS APP IS CALLED SAFETREK AND IS ABSOLUTELY INVALUABLE TO ANYONE WALKING ANYWHERE WHERE THEY DONT FEEL SAFE

YOU ENTER YOUR INFO AND SET A PIN AND THEN WHENEVER YOU DONT FEEL SAFE, YOU HOLD DOWN THE BLUE BUTTON UNTIL YOU DO

ONCE YOU RELEASE THE BUTTON, YOU HAVE 10 SECONDS TO ENTER YOUR PIN, AND IF YOU DONT THE POLICE WILL BE NOTIFIED OF YOUR LOCATION AND DISTRESS CALL

I TRULY BELIEVE THIS APP CAN HELP SOMEONE OUT THERE SO PLEASE DOWNLOAD IT

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/safetrek/id716262008?mt=8

signal boost the shit out of this

THIS IS AMAZING SPREAD THE WORD

I’ve blogged about this before, but this is a great tool for people who have to walk places alone after dark.

halorvic:

Hard.

halorvic:

Hard.

dorianthewellendowed:

marvelwomenofcolor:

aliluveya:

Marvel took two Jewish-Romani characters and made them volunteer for experimentation by Nazi scientists

That’s it. There’s no justifying or excuses or story work arounds to be had. It doesn’t matter they aren’t Magneto’s children in the MCU. It doesn’t matter that they aren’t mutants. It doesn’t matter what reasons Agents of SHIELD or Cap 2 or Avengers 2 gives to try and distance Hydra from the Nazi party. It doesn’t matter what Pietro and Wanda Maximoff say or do in Age of Ultron.

Marvel made Jewish-Roman characters agree to be experimented on by Nazi scientists

That is an insult to every Jewish or Romani writer to ever work on a Marvel book, to every Jewish or Romani fan of comics who saw themselves in the Maximoffs, to every single survivor’s memory who walked away from the Holocaust to then have popular culture throw that narrative back at them and implicate the victim in the perpetrator’s scheme

I don’t even want to hear what excuses you or Marvel have to justify it

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! Please tell me that this is lies :.(

no lies, both aaron and elizabeth confirmed they volunteered, and aaron also used the g slur to identify the maximoffs

The Name Game

fuckyeahblackwidow:

One of the most frequently asked of frequently asked questions is how Natasha’s name works. Is it Natasha or Natalia? Romanoff or Romanova? Which is her real name?

The tricky bit is this: Natalia and Natasha are both forms of the Russian name Наталья. The Natalia/Natasha equivalency doesn’t exist in English, leading to tail-chasing confusion about which is real and which is fake. Natasha is a diminutive form of Natalia, the same way Bill is a nickname for William. “Natalia” is not more authentic or more Russian, it’s just more formal. “Natasha Romanoff” is not an alias the way “Nadine Roman” or “Nancy Rushman” are.

The Romanoff/Romanova issue is just a question of transliteration. The Russian surname is Рома́нов, which has been written Romanoff or Romanov depending on the decade. In Russian, women’s last names take feminine endings to match their grammatical gender— Ivan Belov becomes Yelena Belova, Aleksandr Belinsky becomes Aleksandra Belinskaya. But the feminine endings often get dropped in English translation, e.g. Nastia Liukin, and not Nastia Liukina.

I want to make it out that there isn’t really a standard, “correct” way to translate a Russian name into English. Sometimes the patronymic is dropped, sometimes it isn’t. Immigrant women use the feminine form, or they don’t. It’s a matter of preference, and can also be generational.

I also want to emphasize that comics have never been able to make up their mind.

Read More

a blog!

autisticandpoor:

hello there! this is a new blog for autistics on a limited budget.

i will be posting things like cheap stim toys and where to find them, low spoons cooking and ways to make unfriendly foods into friendly ones, and hopefully some tutorials on making weighted objects.

please feel free to send in things you have discovered such as a good recipe or a store that has a lot of inexpensive stimmy stuff!

hedonistique:

Wanting to make edit/icons of Balthazar and don’t know where to start? Here, this is a list of season 6 screencaps for spn. Below you will find all of his appearance broken down into links by page, not by the starting screen cap. 

6x03 The Third Man.

  • Remeeting Castiel: [ x ]
  • Saving Castiel from Raphael: [ x ]

6x11 Appointment in Samarra.

  • Being summoned by Sam Winchester: [ x ]

6x15 The French Mistake.

  • Balthazar throwing the boys into alt universe: [ x ]
  • Balthazar confronting Raphael: [ x ]

6x17 My Heart Will Go On.

  • Being summoned by the boys: [ x ]
  • ' Attempting ' to stab Fate: [ x ]

6x21 Let it Bleed.

  • Being summoned by the boys: [ x ]
  • Talking to Castiel in the forest: [ x ]
  • Confronting the boys, becoming part of the Team: [ x ]

6x22 The Man Who Knew Too Much.

  • Balthazar ’ checks ’ up on Sam: [ x ]
  • Balthazar is killed: [ x ]

HOME NECESSITIES DELIVERY

vinegardoppio:

vinegardoppio:

HEY SO!! i wanted to throw this out there that i found this really neat service that delivers (eco-friendly!) home products to your house like paper towels and cleaning products and stuff like that. it’s called ePantry and it just started up and is super spiffy! it’s good if you want to save gas or just have difficulties getting to the store to buy stuff, plus the products they offer are generally cheaper than getting them at the store

shipping is $2.99 usually but if you use this link and ask for “the VIP treatment” you can get free shipping for life, 20% discount for life, and $10 in credit for signing up

and you can choose to make it reoccurring as frequently (or not frequently!) as you need!

first order is $25 minimum BUT anything after that has no minimum

check it out!! even if it’s not your thing please pass it on, it could be really helpful for others!!

here’s the link again!

yo please reblog this since it could be really helpful to people with transportation issues or disabilities who can’t always get to the store to get essential stuff! thanks!!

unfortunatesalmon:

sheetmetalsheep:

"No."

"I’m going on an adventure!""No you aren’t, come eat your fruit.""mOOOMMMM"

unfortunatesalmon:

sheetmetalsheep:

"No."

"I’m going on an adventure!"
"No you aren’t, come eat your fruit."
"mOOOMMMM"

thebicker:

spinsterprivilege:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 
While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.
That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

Not only is your favorite author not being compensated for their work, but the editors who help shape your favorite author’s work, the marketing departments who work really, incredibly hard at getting the word out for their authors (in an increasingly glutted marketplace and often, in smaller and mid-sized houses, with low budgets), the designers who create beautiful covers and carefully lay out the interiors of your favorite books so that you can read them easily, etc etc also all lose out when Amazon strong arms publishers into giving them huge discounts that can—and have!—put small publishers (particularly vulnerable ones like LGBTQ and feminist presses) completely out of business.

I really, really encourage everyone to do the following two things:
1) Order books from Powell’s, not Amazon. I bought Edan Lepucki’s “California” from them, and they offer flat $4.95 shipping on orders under $50, and free shipping on orders over $50. They have used and new books and they offer discounts on big sellers. The prices aren’t AS low as Amazon but they’re comparable. I know it’s impossible to completely eliminate buying things on Amazon, but at least try a little bit.
2) Check out your local library. I lived in LA for about 6 years before checking out the LA Public Library System. I was a fool! Now I get ebooks on my Kindle without ever having to go to the library. (pssst - If you don’t finish the book in the three weeks you have it on loan, turn off your Kindle’s wifi and it won’t go away.) I pick up physical books at the location less than a mile from me. I get audiobooks for long drives. I still buy physical books that I want to have for more than three weeks, but for most of my reading, the library is the way to go. If you’re cynical, think of it as getting a better return on investment from your tax dollars.

thebicker:

spinsterprivilege:

lianabrooks:

britegreenstar:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

My library card already gets me multiple “real” books, e-books, audiobooks, magazines and movies per month. For free.

Kindle Unlimited offers nothing from big presses, and no guarantee the authors will get paid fairly for their work. Libraries buy the book up front for a higher price (and a better binding). Kindle Unlimited offers the authors a variable percentage of a as-yet-undetermined-and-unannounced amount of money. 

While Amazon touts Kindle Unlimited at “Netflix For Books!” the reality is Netflix signed contracts with everyone whose work they offer so that actors, screen writers, best boys, and the rest of those people get paid for the shows and movies you watch. Amazon does not.

That means your favorite author isn’t being compensated for their time or work. If you love a book series and want to see the next one get published: buy the book or hit the library. Starving authors quit writing because they like eating. 

Not only is your favorite author not being compensated for their work, but the editors who help shape your favorite author’s work, the marketing departments who work really, incredibly hard at getting the word out for their authors (in an increasingly glutted marketplace and often, in smaller and mid-sized houses, with low budgets), the designers who create beautiful covers and carefully lay out the interiors of your favorite books so that you can read them easily, etc etc also all lose out when Amazon strong arms publishers into giving them huge discounts that can—and have!—put small publishers (particularly vulnerable ones like LGBTQ and feminist presses) completely out of business.

I really, really encourage everyone to do the following two things:

1) Order books from Powell’s, not Amazon. I bought Edan Lepucki’s “California” from them, and they offer flat $4.95 shipping on orders under $50, and free shipping on orders over $50. They have used and new books and they offer discounts on big sellers. The prices aren’t AS low as Amazon but they’re comparable. I know it’s impossible to completely eliminate buying things on Amazon, but at least try a little bit.

2) Check out your local library. I lived in LA for about 6 years before checking out the LA Public Library System. I was a fool! Now I get ebooks on my Kindle without ever having to go to the library. (pssst - If you don’t finish the book in the three weeks you have it on loan, turn off your Kindle’s wifi and it won’t go away.) I pick up physical books at the location less than a mile from me. I get audiobooks for long drives. I still buy physical books that I want to have for more than three weeks, but for most of my reading, the library is the way to go. If you’re cynical, think of it as getting a better return on investment from your tax dollars.

"

1. Trauma permanently changes us.

This is the big, scary truth about trauma: there is no such thing as “getting over it.” The five stages of grief model marks universal stages in learning to accept loss, but the reality is in fact much bigger: a major life disruption leaves a new normal in its wake. There is no “back to the old me.” You are different now, full stop.

This is not a wholly negative thing. Healing from trauma can also mean finding new strength and joy. The goal of healing is not a papering-over of changes in an effort to preserve or present things as normal. It is to acknowledge and wear your new life — warts, wisdom, and all — with courage.

2. Presence is always better than distance.

There is a curious illusion that in times of crisis people “need space.” I don’t know where this assumption originated, but in my experience it is almost always false. Trauma is a disfiguring, lonely time even when surrounded in love; to suffer through trauma alone is unbearable. Do not assume others are reaching out, showing up, or covering all the bases.

It is a much lighter burden to say, “Thanks for your love, but please go away,” than to say, “I was hurting and no one cared for me.” If someone says they need space, respect that. Otherwise, err on the side of presence.

3. Healing is seasonal, not linear.

It is true that healing happens with time. But in the recovery wilderness, emotional healing looks less like a line and more like a wobbly figure-8. It’s perfectly common to get stuck in one stage for months, only to jump to another end entirely … only to find yourself back in the same old mud again next year.

Recovery lasts a long, long time. Expect seasons.

4. Surviving trauma takes “firefighters” and “builders.” Very few people are both.

This is a tough one. In times of crisis, we want our family, partner, or dearest friends to be everything for us. But surviving trauma requires at least two types of people: the crisis team — those friends who can drop everything and jump into the fray by your side, and the reconstruction crew — those whose calm, steady care will help nudge you out the door into regaining your footing in the world. In my experience, it is extremely rare for any individual to be both a firefighter and a builder. This is one reason why trauma is a lonely experience. Even if you share suffering with others, no one else will be able to fully walk the road with you the whole way.

A hard lesson of trauma is learning to forgive and love your partner, best friend, or family even when they fail at one of these roles. Conversely, one of the deepest joys is finding both kinds of companions beside you on the journey.

5. Grieving is social, and so is healing.

For as private a pain as trauma is, for all the healing that time and self-work will bring, we are wired for contact. Just as relationships can hurt us most deeply, it is only through relationship that we can be most fully healed.

It’s not easy to know what this looks like — can I trust casual acquaintances with my hurt? If my family is the source of trauma, can they also be the source of healing? How long until this friend walks away? Does communal prayer help or trivialize?

Seeking out shelter in one another requires tremendous courage, but it is a matter of life or paralysis. One way to start is to practice giving shelter to others.

6. Do not offer platitudes or comparisons. Do not, do not, do not.

“I’m so sorry you lost your son, we lost our dog last year … ” “At least it’s not as bad as … ” “You’ll be stronger when this is over.” “God works in all things for good!”

When a loved one is suffering, we want to comfort them. We offer assurances like the ones above when we don’t know what else to say. But from the inside, these often sting as clueless, careless, or just plain false.

Trauma is terrible. What we need in the aftermath is a friend who can swallow her own discomfort and fear, sit beside us, and just let it be terrible for a while.

7. Allow those suffering to tell their own stories.

Of course, someone who has suffered trauma may say, “This made me stronger,” or “I’m lucky it’s only (x) and not (z).” That is their prerogative. There is an enormous gulf between having someone else thrust his unsolicited or misapplied silver linings onto you, and discovering hope for one’s self. The story may ultimately sound very much like “God works in all things for good,” but there will be a galaxy of disfigurement and longing and disorientation in that confession. Give the person struggling through trauma the dignity of discovering and owning for himself where, and if, hope endures.

8. Love shows up in unexpected ways.

This is a mystifying pattern after trauma, particularly for those in broad community: some near-strangers reach out, some close friends fumble to express care. It’s natural for us to weight expressions of love differently: a Hallmark card, while unsatisfying if received from a dear friend, can be deeply touching coming from an old acquaintance.

Ultimately every gesture of love, regardless of the sender, becomes a step along the way to healing. If there are beatitudes for trauma, I’d say the first is, “Blessed are those who give love to anyone in times of hurt, regardless of how recently they’ve talked or awkwardly reconnected or visited cross-country or ignored each other on the metro.” It may not look like what you’d request or expect, but there will be days when surprise love will be the sweetest.

9. Whatever doesn’t kill you …

In 2011, after a publically humiliating year, comedian Conan O’Brien gave students at Dartmouth College the following warning:

"Nietzsche famously said, ‘Whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.’ … What he failed to stress is that it almost kills you.”
Odd things show up after a serious loss and creep into every corner of life: insatiable anxiety in places that used to bring you joy, detachment or frustration towards your closest companions, a deep distrust of love or presence or vulnerability.

There will be days when you feel like a quivering, cowardly shell of yourself, when despair yawns as a terrible chasm, when fear paralyzes any chance for pleasure. This is just a fight that has to be won, over and over and over again.

10. … Doesn’t kill you.

Living through trauma may teach you resilience. It may help sustain you and others in times of crisis down the road. It may prompt humility. It may make for deeper seasons of joy. It may even make you stronger.

It also may not.

In the end, the hope of life after trauma is simply that you have life after trauma. The days, in their weird and varied richness, go on. So will you.

"

Catherine Woodiwiss, “A New Normal: Ten Things I’ve Learned About Trauma” (via lepetitmortpourmoi)

this. all of this.

(via pluralfloral)